Bridging from Concepts to Data and Computation for eScience — BC2DC’19 @eScience19

The Bridging from Concepts to Data and Computation for eScience (BC2DC’19) Workshop will be held in conjunction with eScience’19 on Tuesday September 24, 2019 in San Diego, CA.

Important Dates

  • Papers due: July 10, 2019 July 15, 2019
  • Paper Acceptance Notification: July 24, 2019
  • Camera-ready deadline: July 29, 2019
  • Workshop: September 24, 2019

Workshop Description

How can we enable e-Science developers to conceptualize research and translate it to system requirements?
How should we make such processes understandable, reliable, stable and sustainable? 
How should advances in engineering deliver the expanding power of distributed computation, heterogeneous (cloud and data) platforms and the massive – still rapidly growing – wealth of data?
How can we make it easier for organizations and researchers to engage in multiple research collaborations and to adapt rapidly to changing requirements and new opportunities?

Research addressing global challenges federates a growing diversity of disciplines, requires sustained contributions from many autonomous organizations and builds on heterogeneous evolving computational platforms. Scientific knowledge is scattered across cloud-based services, local storage, and in source code targeting specific architectures and computational contexts. Concepts reflected in disparate sources are hardly computer-communicable and computer-actionable across or even within disciplines. This makes traceability, communication of methods, provenance gathering and reusing data and methods harder and more time-consuming. Agile response to new needs and opportunities may be accelerated when the available methods and required components have mutually comprehensible descriptions. Commercial clouds play an increasingly important role in large-scale scientific experimentation. Examples of diversity in technology and jurisdiction, as well as in the large-scale exploitation of clouds can be found on both sides of the Atlantic: in the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) as well as in the ongoing massive migration of data and other resources onto Amazon’s AWS by NASA.

It follows that while potential for large-scale data-driven experimentation increases, so does complexity as well as the risk of getting locked into vendor-specific solutions. To deal with these challenges and to help researchers make better and transparent use of diverse infrastructures many systems propose higher-level abstraction to hide and orchestrate infrastructural and implementation details. Domain experts need to directly control sophisticated and dynamic concepts pertaining to data, execution contexts and diverse e-infrastructures. Furthermore, they need mechanisms that allow them to take responsibility for the quality of results, without distracting technological artefacts.

These often take the form of service-based platforms, containerised solutions, APIs, ontological descriptions of underlying resources, provenance repositories, etc. This workshop focuses on platform-driven and domain-specific developments that contribute towards unifying underlying platforms, clouds, data, computational resources and concepts in order to empower research developers to deliver, maintain and communicate larger, increasingly complex eScience systems.

In particular we welcome contributions in the following areas, not excluding other topics of interest:

  • Semantic concept description and implementation 
  • Specification and execution of conceptually formulated methods
  • Component descriptions facilitating reliable composition
  • Architectures, frameworks and design patterns delivering flexible use and incremental composition
  • Cloud, fog, edge and specialized platforms
  • Pervasive and persistent provenance 
  • Platforms of platforms, containers, orchestration and microservices
  • HPC computing over Cloud

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Running Accurate, Scalable, and Reproducible Simulations of Distributed Systems with WRENCH

Scientific workflows are used routinely in numerous scientific domains, and Workflow Management Systems (WMSs) have been developed to orchestrate and optimize workflow executions on distributed platforms. WMSs are complex software systems that interact with complex software infrastructures. Most WMS research and development activities rely on empirical experiments conducted with full-fledged software stacks on actual hardware platforms. Such experiments, however, are limited to hardware and software infrastructures at hand and can be labor- and/or time-intensive. As a result, relying solely on real-world experiments impedes WMS research and development. An alternative is to conduct experiments in simulation.

In this work, we present WRENCH, a WMS simulation framework, whose objectives are (i) accurate and scalable simulations; and (ii) easy simulation software development. WRENCH achieves its first objective by building on the SimGrid framework. While SimGrid is recognized for the accuracy and scalability of its simulation models, it only provides low-level simulation abstractions and thus large software development efforts are required when implementing simulators of complex systems. WRENCH thus achieves its second objective by providing high-level and directly reusable simulation abstractions on top of SimGrid. After describing and giving rationales for WRENCH’s software architecture and APIs, we present a case study in which we apply WRENCH to simulate the Pegasus production WMS. We report on ease of implementation, simulation accuracy, and simulation scalability so as to determine to which extent WRENCH achieves its two above objectives. We also draw both qualitative and quantitative comparisons with a previously proposed workflow simulator.

Empirical cumulative distribution function of task submit times (left) and task completion times (right) for sample real-world (“pegasus”) and simulated (“wrench” and “workflowsim”) executions of Montage-2.0 on AWS-m5.xlarge.

 

Reference to the paper:

  • [PDF] [DOI] H. Casanova, S. Pandey, J. Oeth, R. Tanaka, F. Suter, and R. Ferreira da Silva, “WRENCH: A Framework for Simulating Workflow Management Systems,” in 13th Workshop on Workflows in Support of Large-Scale Science (WORKS’18), 2018, p. 74–85.
    [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{casanova-works-2018,
    title = {{WRENCH: A Framework for Simulating Workflow Management Systems}},
    author = {Casanova, Henri and Pandey, Suraj and Oeth, James and Tanaka, Ryan and Suter, Frederic and Ferreira da Silva, Rafael},
    booktitle = {13th Workshop on Workflows in Support of Large-Scale Science (WORKS'18)},
    year = {2018},
    pages = {74--85},
    doi = {10.1109/WORKS.2018.00013}
    }

 


 

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WRENCH: Workflow Management System Simulation Workbench


Abstract – WRENCH enables novel avenues for scientific workflow use, research, development, and education. WRENCH capitalizes on recent and critical advances in the state of the art of distributed platform/application simulation. WRENCH builds on top of the open-source SimGrid simulation framework. SimGrid enables the simulation of large-scale distributed applications in a way that is accurate (via validated simulation models), scalable (low ratio of simulation time to simulated time, ability to run large simulations on a single computer with low compute, memory, and energy footprints), and expressive (ability to simulate arbitrary platform, application, and execution scenarios). WRENCH provides directly usable high-level simulation abstractions using SimGrid as a foundation. More information on https://wrench-project.org.

In a nutshell, WRENCH makes it possible to:

  • Prototype implementations of Workflow Management System (WMS) components and underlying algorithms;
  • Quickly, scalably, and accurately simulate arbitrary workflow and platform scenarios for a simulated WMS implementation; and
  • Run extensive experimental campaigns to conclusively compare workflow executions, platform architectures, and WMS algorithms and designs.

 

Reference to the paper:

  • [PDF] [DOI] H. Casanova, S. Pandey, J. Oeth, R. Tanaka, F. Suter, and R. Ferreira da Silva, “WRENCH: A Framework for Simulating Workflow Management Systems,” in 13th Workshop on Workflows in Support of Large-Scale Science (WORKS’18), 2018, p. 74–85.
    [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{casanova-works-2018,
    title = {{WRENCH: A Framework for Simulating Workflow Management Systems}},
    author = {Casanova, Henri and Pandey, Suraj and Oeth, James and Tanaka, Ryan and Suter, Frederic and Ferreira da Silva, Rafael},
    booktitle = {13th Workshop on Workflows in Support of Large-Scale Science (WORKS'18)},
    year = {2018},
    pages = {74--85},
    doi = {10.1109/WORKS.2018.00013}
    }

 

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The Interplay of Workflow Execution and Resource Provisioning


Presentation held at the 18th SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, 2018
Resource Management, Scheduling, Workflows: Critical Middleware for HPC and Clouds
Tokyo, Japan

Abstract – This talk will examine issues of workflow execution, in particular using the Pegasus Workflow Management System, on distributed resources and how these resources can be provisioned ahead of the workflow execution. Pegasus was designed, implemented and supported to provide abstractions that enable scientists to focus on structuring their computations without worrying about the details of the target cyberinfrastructure. To support these workflow abstractions Pegasus provides automation capabilities that seamlessly map workflows onto target resources, sparing scientists the overhead of managing the data flow, job scheduling, fault recovery and adaptation of their applications. In some cases, it is beneficial to provision the resources ahead of the workflow execution, enabling the re-use of resources across workflow tasks. The talk will examine the benefits of resource provisioning for workflow execution.

 

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Performance Analysis of an I/O-Intensive Workflow executing on Google Cloud and Amazon Web Services


Presentation held at the 18th Workshop on Advances in Parallel and Distributed Computational Models, 2016
Chicago, IL, USA – 30th IEEE International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium

Abstract – Scientific workflows have become the mainstream to conduct large-scale scientific research. In the meantime, cloud computing has emerged as an alternative computing paradigm. In this paper, we conduct an analysis of the performance of an I/O-intensive real scientific workflow on cloud environments using makespan (the turnaround time for a workflow to complete its execution) as the key performance metric. In particular, we assess the impact of varying the storage configurations on workflow performance when executing on Google Cloud and Amazon Web Services. We aim to understand the performance bottlenecks of the popular cloud-based execution environments. Experimental results show significant differences in application performance for different configurations. They also reveal that Amazon Web Services outperforms Google Cloud with equivalent application and system configurations. We then investigate the root cause of these results using provenance data and by benchmarking disk and network I/O on both infrastructures. Lastly, we also suggest modifications in the standard cloud storage APIs, which will reduce the makespan for I/O-intensive workflows.

 

Related Publication

  • [PDF] [DOI] H. Nawaz, G. Juve, R. Ferreira da Silva, and E. Deelman, “Performance Analysis of an I/O-Intensive Workflow executing on Google Cloud and Amazon Web Services,” in 18th Workshop on Advances in Parallel and Distributed Computational Models, 2016, p. 535–544.
    [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{nawaz-apdcm-2016,
    author = {Nawaz, Hassan and Juve, Gideon and Ferreira da Silva, Rafael and Deelman, Ewa},
    title = {Performance Analysis of an I/O-Intensive Workflow executing on Google Cloud and Amazon Web Services},
    booktitle = {18th Workshop on Advances in Parallel and Distributed Computational Models},
    series = {APDCM'16},
    year = {2016},
    doi = {10.1109/IPDPSW.2016.90},
    pages = {535--544}
    }

 

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